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George Santos posts release incorrectly saying he’s been sworn into House

Rep.-elect George Santos, R-New York, speaks at an annual leadership meeting of the Republican Jewish Coalition Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher) John Locher/AP

George Santos posts release incorrectly saying he’s been sworn into House

Conrad Hoyt

January 04, 12:08 AM January 04, 12:53 AM

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Rep.-elect George Santos (R-NY) posted a press release saying he was sworn in as a member of the House of Representatives by the speaker of the House. The only problem is, there currently is no speaker of the House and thus no one was sworn in on Tuesday.

Santos’s release, which has since been deleted, on the House website, additionally read, “Representative George Santos was added to the rolls of the House upon executing the oath of office.”

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NBC News reporter Sahil Kapur provided more context into the misstep, saying it wasn’t just Santos, but “the same language appeared for numerous other freshman members on their new websites,” including on Robert Garcia’s (D-CA) site.

Politico reporter Olivia Beavers tweeted that she was told the release was done by the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer for all freshman offices and “that it was published without some offices knowing about it.” However, given the fact that Santos is entrenched in controversy surrounding his lies on the campaign trail, people were not quick to believe Santos was just the victim of a mistake.

“In even more shocking news, Santos was also sworn in as the new President of the United States after beating Biden in gladiator combat,” one Twitter user wrote. “Surprised he didn’t say he’s now Speaker,” added another.

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“Talk about being on-brand,” another response read, fitting the sentiment of many people frustrated with the lies committed by the incoming congressman.

Despite admitting to lying about much of his biography, Santos has repeatedly said he won’t step down. But as he waits to actually be sworn into Congress once a speaker is chosen, Santos has to deal with another issue: being the target of a fraud investigation by authorities in Brazil.

The House agreed to adjourn Tuesday after Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) failed to secure the speakership in three ballots cast, ending the day with his hard-fought bid for the gavel in jeopardy.

An investigation from the New York Times in December found Santos had deliberately lied about numerous parts of his life, including claims that his grandparents were Ukrainian Jewish Holocaust survivors, that he worked at Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, and that he was Jewish, among many other things.

Soon after, Santos admitted to lying on several parts of his resume in an interview with the New York Post, and he said other falsehoods were the result of miscommunication. Despite heavy criticism from all sides, he has refused to step down from his congressional seat.

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